Leigh Fisheries

Species scientific name: Thunnus alalunga
FAO area: 81
Fishing method: Long line
Last audit date: 30/11/2017 (Surv.)
Next audit within:
Status: Approved
Audit Report
Basic description of the fleet/fishery
Fishery client: Leigh Fisheries.
Fishing area: FAO 81; Pacific, Southwest – FMA Area 1, 2 and 9.
Fishing vessels: The Company has a fleet of 55 vessels.
Vessels audited on site as fleet samples: 900855; 15878; 2024; 5876.
Fishing method: Long line.
Certified species: Scientific name / Common name
Thunnus alalunga /Albacore;
 
Management summary
The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) manages New Zealand’s fisheries under a national fisheries plan. The cornerstone of New Zealand fisheries management is the Quota Management System (QMS). The most targeted species are regularly evaluated, while the bycatch coastal species present a lack of information due to the low level of catches. All vessels maintain a logbook. A Catch Landing Return (CLR) is recorded at every trip, indicating the target species and bycatches. CLR is delivered to the MPI office at the 15 of every month and it is matched with the declaration of the Licensed Fish Receivers.
Stock status summary
According to the MPI, Albacore is reported as not overexploited and overfished.
 
Bycatch / discards
Bycatch is very low in long line fishing method. The main species caught by accidents are birds and the most common is the Black Petrel (Procellaria parkinsoni). The fishing vessels use a Tori line system to scare the birds, reducing catches to negligible numbers. There are no discards, since all fish caught is marketed by the unit of certification. All bycatch is recorded on the CLR.
Habitat Impact 
The ecosystem impact of the fishery is taken into account in the assessment carried out by MPI. The fleet is just using passive gears that have no impact on seabed. No FAD’s are employed. The Albacore is eventually caught in the long lines, which are tagged with different marker buoys positioned at a certain distance on the ling to prevent the loss of a piece of the line. All the skippers are committed to recover the fishing gears to avoid ghost fishing. Leigh Fisheries is Dolphin Safe certified.
Social Accountability performance
The fleet complies with the human rights and labour regulations of New Zealand.
Conclusion with reasons for approval
The fleet complies with Friend of the Sea requirements, without any non-conformities.

Leal Santos

Species scientific names: Katsuwonus pelamis,Thunnus albacares,Thunnus alalunga
FAO area: 41
Fishing method: Pole and line
Last audit date: 24/04/2018
Next audit within: 24/04/2019
Status: Approved
Audit Report
Basic description of the fleet/fishery
Fishery client: Indústrias Alimentícias Leal Santos Ltda.
Fishing area: FAO 41; Atlantic, Southwest.
Fishing vessels: The Company has a fleet of 7 vessels.
Vessels audited on site as fleet samples: 4610036771; 4610037033.
Fishing method: Pole and Line.
Certified species: scientific name / common name
Katsuwonus pelamis / Skipjack Tuna, Thunnus albacares / Yellowfin Tuna, Thunnus alalunga / Albacore
Management summary
The Fisheries Secretary regulates the fisheries in Brazil, issuing fishing permits, fishing seasons, fishing quotas (when applicable) and registering the companies. The fishing vessels are real time monitored. Important scientific sources are available to direct fisheries management, such as data from Infofish, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT). In addition, Leal Santos has an agreement with the Federal University of Rio Grande (FURG) in which the company provides data on its fisheries and the University conducts research studies that are used as guidelines.
 
Stock status summary
According to the most recent ICCAT stock assessments, the stocks of the three species are not overexploited and overfished. ICCAT recommendations are taken into consideration by the management of the company.
Bycatch / discards
Pole and line is used from 5 up 90 miles from the coast, with very low impact, since it is a selective fishing method. Bycatch, whenever occurs, is recorded in the logbooks and unloading reports.
Habitat Impact 
Pole and line is a selective fishing method, which causes low impact on ecosystem. In addition, the purse seine fishing, which is done to capture baits, is performed in deep oceanic areas without touching the seabed.
Social Accountability performance
The fleet complies with the human rights and Brazilian labour regulations.
 
Conclusion with reasons for approval
The fleet complies with Friend of the Sea requirements, without any non-conformities.

Tropic Fishery (PVT) LTD

Species scientific names: Thunnus albacares, Thunnus obesus
FAO area: 57
Fishing method: Long line
Last audit date: 15/05/2018
Next audit within: 15/05/2019
Status: Approved
Audit Report
Basic description of the fleet/fishery
Fishery client: TROPIC FISHERY (PVT) LTD, Sri Lanka.
Fishing area: FAO 57, Indian Ocean.
Fishing vessels: The Company has a fleet of 16 vessels.
Vessels audited remotely: Li-IMUL-A-0036CBO; Li-IMUL-A-0046MTR; Li-IMUL-A-0068TCO; Li-IMUL-A-0098MTR.
Fishing method: Long line.
Certified species: scientific name / common name
Thunnus albacares / Yellowfin Tuna (YFT), Thunnus obesus / Bigeye Tuna (BET)
Management summary
The Ministry of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Development (MFARD) is the agency that manage fisheries in Sri Lanka. Fisheries activities are planned, administrated and monitored under the guidance of the Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (DFAR). In addition, the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission (IOTC), an intergovernmental organisation, is responsible for the management of tuna and tuna-like species in the Indian Ocean. Fisheries management organisations are held annually, along with intermittent meetings with the scientific committee meeting, technical committee meeting and compliance committee meeting.
Stock status summary
The stock of both species are managed by IOTC. Most of Sri Lanka’s fishing vessels are artisanal (<24m) and the organisation buys 100% of its purchase (YEF and BET) from these small fishing vessels. According to the IOTC Executive summary on YFT, the average catch of Sri Lanka’s main fleet is 9%. Likewise, according to the IOTC Executive summary on BET, the stock is not overfished and not subject to overfishing. 
Bycatch / discards
The fishing gear used is the Deep-set Long line, which reduces the by-catch percentage. The logbook is used in all vessels and data are available on the DFAR and IOTC website. Evidence of minimal by-catch (targeted as incidental catch; there is no records of turtles and sharks). All fish caught, including by-catch and discards, are used for human consumption.
Habitat Impact 
Currently, encouraged by government actions to reduce gill net fishing, most of the fishing are done by Long line. This fishing method has been selected so that the endangered species is not caught (> 100m depth Longline Deep-set). No degradation of seabed.
Social Accountability performance
The fleet complies with the human rights and Srilankan regulations.
Conclusion with reasons for approval
The fleet complies with Friend of the Sea requirements, without any major non-conformities.

Panofi Co. Ltd

Species scientific names: Thunnus albacares, Thunnus obesus, Katsuwonus pelamis
FAO area: 34
Fishing methods: Purse seine and long line
Last audit date: 21/03/2017
Next audit within: 20/03/2018
Status: Approved
Audit Report
Corrective Actions
Basic description of the fleet/fishery
Fishery client: TROPIC FISHERY (PVT) LTD, Sri Lanka.
Fishing area: FAO 57, Indian Ocean.
Fishing vessels: The Company has a fleet of 16 vessels.
Vessels audited remotely: Li-IMUL-A-0036CBO; Li-IMUL-A-0046MTR; Li-IMUL-A-0068TCO; Li-IMUL-A-0098MTR.
Fishing method: Long line.
Certified species: scientific name / common name
Thunnus albacares / Yellowfin Tuna (YFT), Thunnus obesus / Bigeye Tuna (BET)
Management summary
The Ministry of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Development (MFARD) is the agency that manage fisheries in Sri Lanka. Fisheries activities are planned, administrated and monitored under the guidance of the Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (DFAR). In addition, the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission (IOTC), an intergovernmental organisation, is responsible for the management of tuna and tuna-like species in the Indian Ocean. Fisheries management organisations are held annually, along with intermittent meetings with the scientific committee meeting, technical committee meeting and compliance committee meeting.
Stock status summary
The stock of both species are managed by IOTC. Most of Sri Lanka’s fishing vessels are artisanal (<24m) and the organisation buys 100% of its purchase (YEF and BET) from these small fishing vessels. According to the IOTC Executive summary on YFT, the average catch of Sri Lanka’s main fleet is 9%. Likewise, according to the IOTC Executive summary on BET, the stock is not overfished and not subject to overfishing. 
Bycatch / discards
The fishing gear used is the Deep-set Long line, which reduces the by-catch percentage. The logbook is used in all vessels and data are available on the DFAR and IOTC website. Evidence of minimal by-catch (targeted as incidental catch; there is no records of turtles and sharks). All fish caught, including by-catch and discards, are used for human consumption.
Habitat Impact 
Currently, encouraged by government actions to reduce gill net fishing, most of the fishing are done by Long line. This fishing method has been selected so that the endangered species is not caught (> 100m depth Longline Deep-set). No degradation of seabed.
Social Accountability performance
The fleet complies with the human rights and Srilankan regulations.
Conclusion with reasons for approval
The fleet complies with Friend of the Sea requirements, without any major non-conformities.

Optuna No 42

Species scientific names: Thunnus albacares, Thunnus alalunga, Katsuwonus pelamis, Thunnus obesus
FAO area: 34
Fishing method: Pole and line
Last audit date: 12/08/2016
Next audit within: 22/11/2017
Status: Due to surveillance audit
Audit Report
Corrective Actions
YF, BE, SJ Tuna – Purse seine & Long line fleets – FAO 34
Species: Thunnus albacares, Thunnus obesus, Katsuwonus pelamis
Gear type: Purse seine, long line
Fishing Area: FAO Area 34, Atlantic Eastern Central
Fishery management: The International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) is the competent regional organisation for fisheries management in the region (FAO area 34), responsible for the conservation and management of tuna and tuna-like species in the Atlantic Ocean. The stocks are assessed by the Standing Committee on Research and Statistics (SCRS) who makes recommendations to ICCAT.
Stock Status: According to the ICCAT (2015), the stock of bigeye tuna (BE) is estimated to be overfished and overfishing is occurring. The ratio of F2014/FMSY was estimated at 1.28. Estimates of Fcurrent/FMSY from the model ranged from 0.62 to 1.85. The ratio of spawning biomass B2014/BMSY was estimated at 0.67. Estimates of Bcurrent/BMSY from the model ranged from 0.48 to 1.20. The estimate of MSY is 78,800 tonnes (range: 67,700 to 85,000 tonnes). MSY has been reduced considerably through harvest of small bigeye. Current catches (79,600 tonnes) are above MSY.
The most recent full assessment of yellowfin tuna (YF) was carried out by SCRS in 2016. The ratio of F2014/FMSY is estimated at 0.77 (range 0.53-1.05), indicating that overfishing is not occurring. The (2014) ratio of spawning biomass Bcurrent/BMSY is estimated at 0.95 (range 0.71-1.36). This indicates that the stock in 2014 is in a slightly overfished state. The SCRS notes that the two main groups (clusters) of abundance indicators used in the models show conflicting trends in the last few years: An increasing trend in biomass with one, and a constant relative abundance since 1990 with the other. The estimate of MSY is 126,300 tonnes (range 119,100-151,300). MSY is lower than in previous decades because the overall fishery selectivity has shifted towards smaller yellowfin, mainly through fishing on FADs. Current catch (108,900 t) is below MSY.
The stock of skipjack tuna (SJ) was assessed by SCRS in 2014, using data up to 2013. The ratio of Fcurrent/FMSY is likely below 1.0, indicating that overfishing is not occurring. The ratio of spawning biomass Bcurrent/BMSY is likely above 1.0, indicating that the stock is not in an overfished state. The value of MSY is probably higher than previously estimated (143,000-170,000 tonnes).
Habitat impact: The fishing gears used (i.e. pole and line and purse seine) do not interact with the seabed, hence the fishing activities do not damage the marine habitat.
Bycatch and discards: Accidental catches are very rare and include blue runner, trigger fish, wahoo, barracuda and marlin. These are released alive when possible otherwise bycatch is recorded on logbooks.
Discards are less than 0.1% of the total catch.
References:
ICCAT https://www.iccat.int/en/
ISSF. 2016. ISSF Tuna Stock Status Update, 2016: Status of the world fisheries for tuna. ISSF Technical Report 2016-05B. International Seafood Sustainability Foundation, Washington, D.C., USA.

Frescomar SARL

Species scientific names: Thunnus albacares, Thunnus alalunga, Katsuwonus pelamis, Thunnus obesus
FAO area: 34
Fishing method: Pole and line
Last audit date: 03/06/2017
Next audit within: 04/10/2018
Status: Approved
Audit Report
YF, BE, SJ Tuna – Purse seine & Long line fleets – FAO 34
Species: Thunnus albacares, Thunnus obesus, Katsuwonus pelamis
Gear type: Purse seine, long line
Fishing Area: FAO Area 34, Atlantic Eastern Central
Fishery management: The International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) is the competent regional organisation for fisheries management in the region (FAO area 34), responsible for the conservation and management of tuna and tuna-like species in the Atlantic Ocean. The stocks are assessed by the Standing Committee on Research and Statistics (SCRS) who makes recommendations to ICCAT.
Stock Status: According to the ICCAT (2015), the stock of bigeye tuna (BE) is estimated to be overfished and overfishing is occurring. The ratio of F2014/FMSY was estimated at 1.28. Estimates of Fcurrent/FMSY from the model ranged from 0.62 to 1.85. The ratio of spawning biomass B2014/BMSY was estimated at 0.67. Estimates of Bcurrent/BMSY from the model ranged from 0.48 to 1.20. The estimate of MSY is 78,800 tonnes (range: 67,700 to 85,000 tonnes). MSY has been reduced considerably through harvest of small bigeye. Current catches (79,600 tonnes) are above MSY.
The most recent full assessment of yellowfin tuna (YF) was carried out by SCRS in 2016. The ratio of F2014/FMSY is estimated at 0.77 (range 0.53-1.05), indicating that overfishing is not occurring. The (2014) ratio of spawning biomass Bcurrent/BMSY is estimated at 0.95 (range 0.71-1.36). This indicates that the stock in 2014 is in a slightly overfished state. The SCRS notes that the two main groups (clusters) of abundance indicators used in the models show conflicting trends in the last few years: An increasing trend in biomass with one, and a constant relative abundance since 1990 with the other. The estimate of MSY is 126,300 tonnes (range 119,100-151,300). MSY is lower than in previous decades because the overall fishery selectivity has shifted towards smaller yellowfin, mainly through fishing on FADs. Current catch (108,900 t) is below MSY.
The stock of skipjack tuna (SJ) was assessed by SCRS in 2014, using data up to 2013. The ratio of Fcurrent/FMSY is likely below 1.0, indicating that overfishing is not occurring. The ratio of spawning biomass Bcurrent/BMSY is likely above 1.0, indicating that the stock is not in an overfished state. The value of MSY is probably higher than previously estimated (143,000-170,000 tonnes).
Habitat impact: The fishing gears used (i.e. pole and line and purse seine) do not interact with the seabed, hence the fishing activities do not damage the marine habitat.
Bycatch and discards: Accidental catches are very rare and include blue runner, trigger fish, wahoo, barracuda and marlin. These are released alive when possible otherwise bycatch is recorded on logbooks.
Discards are less than 0.1% of the total catch.
References:
ICCAT https://www.iccat.int/en/
ISSF. 2016. ISSF Tuna Stock Status Update, 2016: Status of the world fisheries for tuna. ISSF Technical Report 2016-05B. International Seafood Sustainability Foundation, Washington, D.C., USA.

Industrias Alimenticias Leal Santos

Species scientific names: Thunnus albacares, Thunnus alalunga, Katsuwonus pelamis
FAO area: 41
Fishing method: Pole and line
Last audit date: 25/03/2017
Next audit within: 11/05/2018
Status: Approved
Audit Report
Corrective Actions
Brazil – YF, SJ, AL tuna – Pole and line – FAO 41
Species: Thunnus albacares, Katsuwonus pelamis, Thunnus alalunga
Gear type: Pole and line
Fishing Area: FAO Area 41 Atlantic Southwest
Fishery management: The International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) is an inter-governmental fishery organisation responsible for the conservation of tunas and tuna-like species in the Atlantic Ocean and the management of their fisheries. ICCAT compiles fishery statistics from its members and from all entities fishing for these species in the Atlantic Ocean, coordinates research, including stock assessment, on behalf of its members, develops scientific-based management advice, provides a mechanism for Contracting Parties to agree on management measures, and produces relevant publications.
Science underpins the management decisions made by ICCAT. Much of the information available on this site relates to scientific data, reports of scientific meetings and to scientific articles.
The fishery collects data also from FAO and the Federal University of Rio Grande (FURG), who keeps records of all landings, and provides studies and projections for fishing companies and the government.
Stock status
Yellowfin tuna
The most recent full assessment of yellowfin tuna was carried out by the Standing Committee of Research and Statistics (SCRS) of ICCAT in 2016.
The ratio of Fcurrent/FMSY is estimated at 0.77 (based on data from 2014), indicating that overfishing is not occurring.
The ratio of spawning biomass SSBcurrent/SSBMSY is estimated at 0.95 (based on data from 2014). This indicates that the stock in 2014 is in a slightly overfished state.
Skipjack tuna
The western skipjack tuna stock was assessed by SCRS in 2014, using data up to 2013.
The SCRS concluded that the ratio of Fcurrent/FMSY is around 0.7, indicating that overfishing is not occurring.  The ratio of spawning biomass SSBcurrent/SSBMSY is close to 1.3, indicating that the stock is not in an overfished state.
Albacore tuna
The most recent assessment for the southern stock of albacore was conducted by SCRS in 2016.
The median ratio of Fcurrent/FMSY in 2014 is estimated at 0.54, indicating that overfishing is not occurring.
The ratio of biomass SSBcurrent/SSBMSY in 2015 estimated at 1.10. This indicates that that the stock is not in an overfished state.
Habitat impact: The fleet uses pole and line that do not interact with the seabed and the benthic communities, hence its impact on the habitat is not significant. Purse seine fishing for baits is carried out in deep ocean areas, with no interaction of the fishing gear with the seabed.
No FADs are used in this fishery.
Bycatch: Accidental catches reported are limited due to the high selectivity of the fishing gear. Seldom catch of Coryphaena hippurus are reported.
Discards: The discard rate of pole and line fishing is ≤ 1% (http://www.fao.org/docrep/008/y5936e/y5936e09.htm#bm09.1)
References
ISSF. 2016. ISSF Tuna Stock Status Update, 2016: Status of the world fisheries for tuna. ISSF Technical Report 2016-05B. International Seafood Sustainability Foundation, Washington, D.C., USA.
ICCAT https://www.iccat.int/en/

FRI Seafood Trading*

Species scientific name: Thunnus albacares
FAO area: 71
Fishing method: Hand line
Last audit date: 11/03/2017
Next audit within: 01/05/2020
Status: Approved
Audit Report
Corrective Actions
Philippines-Yellowfin tuna – Hand line – FAO 71
Species: Thunnus albacares
Gear type: Hand line
Fishing Area: FAO Area 71 Pacific Southwest
Fishery management: The Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) is the competent regional organisation for fisheries management in the region (FAO Statistical Area 71). WCP Ocean stocks are assessed by the Secretariat of the Pacific Communities and the results are reviewed by the scientific committee, which makes recommendations to the WCPFC.
The Philippines Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) also conducts stock assessment studies through the National Stock Assessment Program and releases annual fishery data through the Philippines Fisheries Profile.
The Philippines, as a member of the WCPFC, adheres to conservation and management measures in mitigating the impacts of tuna fishing on non-target species and prohibition of fishing on data buoys.
Stock status: The Western and Central Pacific yellowfin tuna stock is not overfished and overfishing is not occurring, based on 2016 data.
The latest (2012) estimates of spawning biomass for yellowfin tuna are above the level that supports MSY. Current (2015) catches are below MSY and overfishing is not occurring.
Habitat impact: The fleet uses pelagic hand lines that do not interact with the seabed and the benthic communities, hence its impact on the habitat is not significant.
Bycatch: Hand line is a highly selective gear with negligible bycatch. Accidental bycatch consists in marine mammals, turtles, dolphins and sharks. These are considered illegal catch and are returned to the sea when caught. Furthermore, hand line fishing uses barbless hooks that allow accidentally caught animals to have a higher chance of survival when returned at sea.
Hand line tuna fishery in the Philippines catches about 15% of non-target species including marlin, swordfish and sailfish that have economic value and are not discarded.
Discards: Discards are reported at landing by individual boat owners. The Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources, through the National Stock Assessment Program, collects landings data for the National Statistics and fisheries management and to be integrated into the catch report submitted to WCPFC as part of the obligation of the Philippines as member of the Commission.
Discards in hand line tuna fishing is negligible (<1% of the total catch) as most of accidental bycatch is sold to the local market for human consumption.
References
ISSF. 2016. ISSF Tuna Stock Status Update, 2016: Status of the world fisheries for tuna. ISSF Technical Report 2016-05B. International Seafood Sustainability Foundation, Washington, D.C., USA.
WCPFC. 2016. Executive Summary of the Twelfth regular session of the Scientific Committee. Bali, Indonesia, 3-11 August 2016.
WCPFC. 2016b. Estimates of annual catches in the WCPFC statistical area. Document WCPFC-SC12-2016/ST IP-01.

Nuevo Fresco Marine Trading Corporation*

Species scientific name: Thunnus albacares
FAO area: 71
Fishing method: Hand line
Last audit date: 11/03/2017
Next audit within: 01/05/2020
Status: Approved
Audit Report
Corrective Actions
Philippines-Yellowfin tuna – Hand line – FAO 71
Species: Thunnus albacares
Gear type: Hand line
Fishing Area: FAO Area 71 Pacific Southwest
Fishery management: The Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) is the competent regional organisation for fisheries management in the region (FAO Statistical Area 71). WCP Ocean stocks are assessed by the Secretariat of the Pacific Communities and the results are reviewed by the scientific committee, which makes recommendations to the WCPFC.
The Philippines Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) also conducts stock assessment studies through the National Stock Assessment Program and releases annual fishery data through the Philippines Fisheries Profile.
The Philippines, as a member of the WCPFC, adheres to conservation and management measures in mitigating the impacts of tuna fishing on non-target species and prohibition of fishing on data buoys.
Stock status: The Western and Central Pacific yellowfin tuna stock is not overfished and overfishing is not occurring, based on 2016 data.
The latest (2012) estimates of spawning biomass for yellowfin tuna are above the level that supports MSY. Current (2015) catches are below MSY and overfishing is not occurring.
Habitat impact: The fleet uses pelagic hand lines that do not interact with the seabed and the benthic communities, hence its impact on the habitat is not significant.
Bycatch: Hand line is a highly selective gear with negligible bycatch. Accidental bycatch consists in marine mammals, turtles, dolphins and sharks. These are considered illegal catch and are returned to the sea when caught. Furthermore, hand line fishing uses barbless hooks that allow accidentally caught animals to have a higher chance of survival when returned at sea.
Hand line tuna fishery in the Philippines catches about 15% of non-target species including marlin, swordfish and sailfish that have economic value and are not discarded.
Discards: Discards are reported at landing by individual boat owners. The Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources, through the National Stock Assessment Program, collects landings data for the National Statistics and fisheries management and to be integrated into the catch report submitted to WCPFC as part of the obligation of the Philippines as member of the Commission.
Discards in hand line tuna fishing is negligible (<1% of the total catch) as most of accidental bycatch is sold to the local market for human consumption.
References
ISSF. 2016. ISSF Tuna Stock Status Update, 2016: Status of the world fisheries for tuna. ISSF Technical Report 2016-05B. International Seafood Sustainability Foundation, Washington, D.C., USA.
WCPFC. 2016. Executive Summary of the Twelfth regular session of the Scientific Committee. Bali, Indonesia, 3-11 August 2016.
WCPFC. 2016b. Estimates of annual catches in the WCPFC statistical area. Document WCPFC-SC12-2016/ST IP-01.

Jarla Trading*

Species scientific name: Thunnus albacares
FAO area: 71
Fishing method: Hand line
Last audit date: 11/03/2017
Next audit within: 01/05/2020
Status: Approved
Audit Report
Corrective Actions
Philippines-Yellowfin tuna – Hand line – FAO 71
Species: Thunnus albacares
Gear type: Hand line
Fishing Area: FAO Area 71 Pacific Southwest
Fishery management: The Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) is the competent regional organisation for fisheries management in the region (FAO Statistical Area 71). WCP Ocean stocks are assessed by the Secretariat of the Pacific Communities and the results are reviewed by the scientific committee, which makes recommendations to the WCPFC.
The Philippines Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) also conducts stock assessment studies through the National Stock Assessment Program and releases annual fishery data through the Philippines Fisheries Profile.
The Philippines, as a member of the WCPFC, adheres to conservation and management measures in mitigating the impacts of tuna fishing on non-target species and prohibition of fishing on data buoys.
Stock status: The Western and Central Pacific yellowfin tuna stock is not overfished and overfishing is not occurring, based on 2016 data.
The latest (2012) estimates of spawning biomass for yellowfin tuna are above the level that supports MSY. Current (2015) catches are below MSY and overfishing is not occurring.
Habitat impact: The fleet uses pelagic hand lines that do not interact with the seabed and the benthic communities, hence its impact on the habitat is not significant.
Bycatch: Hand line is a highly selective gear with negligible bycatch. Accidental bycatch consists in marine mammals, turtles, dolphins and sharks. These are considered illegal catch and are returned to the sea when caught. Furthermore, hand line fishing uses barbless hooks that allow accidentally caught animals to have a higher chance of survival when returned at sea.
Hand line tuna fishery in the Philippines catches about 15% of non-target species including marlin, swordfish and sailfish that have economic value and are not discarded.
Discards: Discards are reported at landing by individual boat owners. The Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources, through the National Stock Assessment Program, collects landings data for the National Statistics and fisheries management and to be integrated into the catch report submitted to WCPFC as part of the obligation of the Philippines as member of the Commission.
Discards in hand line tuna fishing is negligible (<1% of the total catch) as most of accidental bycatch is sold to the local market for human consumption.
References
ISSF. 2016. ISSF Tuna Stock Status Update, 2016: Status of the world fisheries for tuna. ISSF Technical Report 2016-05B. International Seafood Sustainability Foundation, Washington, D.C., USA.
WCPFC. 2016. Executive Summary of the Twelfth regular session of the Scientific Committee. Bali, Indonesia, 3-11 August 2016.
WCPFC. 2016b. Estimates of annual catches in the WCPFC statistical area. Document WCPFC-SC12-2016/ST IP-01.

E.M. Buenaventura Trading*

Species scientific name: Thunnus albacares
FAO area: 71
Fishing method: Hand line
Last audit date: 11/03/2017
Next audit within: 01/05/2020
Status: Approved
Audit Report
Corrective Actions
Philippines-Yellowfin tuna – Hand line – FAO 71
Species: Thunnus albacares
Gear type: Hand line
Fishing Area: FAO Area 71 Pacific Southwest
Fishery management: The Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) is the competent regional organisation for fisheries management in the region (FAO Statistical Area 71). WCP Ocean stocks are assessed by the Secretariat of the Pacific Communities and the results are reviewed by the scientific committee, which makes recommendations to the WCPFC.
The Philippines Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) also conducts stock assessment studies through the National Stock Assessment Program and releases annual fishery data through the Philippines Fisheries Profile.
The Philippines, as a member of the WCPFC, adheres to conservation and management measures in mitigating the impacts of tuna fishing on non-target species and prohibition of fishing on data buoys.
Stock status: The Western and Central Pacific yellowfin tuna stock is not overfished and overfishing is not occurring, based on 2016 data.
The latest (2012) estimates of spawning biomass for yellowfin tuna are above the level that supports MSY. Current (2015) catches are below MSY and overfishing is not occurring.
Habitat impact: The fleet uses pelagic hand lines that do not interact with the seabed and the benthic communities, hence its impact on the habitat is not significant.
Bycatch: Hand line is a highly selective gear with negligible bycatch. Accidental bycatch consists in marine mammals, turtles, dolphins and sharks. These are considered illegal catch and are returned to the sea when caught. Furthermore, hand line fishing uses barbless hooks that allow accidentally caught animals to have a higher chance of survival when returned at sea.
Hand line tuna fishery in the Philippines catches about 15% of non-target species including marlin, swordfish and sailfish that have economic value and are not discarded.
Discards: Discards are reported at landing by individual boat owners. The Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources, through the National Stock Assessment Program, collects landings data for the National Statistics and fisheries management and to be integrated into the catch report submitted to WCPFC as part of the obligation of the Philippines as member of the Commission.
Discards in hand line tuna fishing is negligible (<1% of the total catch) as most of accidental bycatch is sold to the local market for human consumption.
References
ISSF. 2016. ISSF Tuna Stock Status Update, 2016: Status of the world fisheries for tuna. ISSF Technical Report 2016-05B. International Seafood Sustainability Foundation, Washington, D.C., USA.
WCPFC. 2016. Executive Summary of the Twelfth regular session of the Scientific Committee. Bali, Indonesia, 3-11 August 2016.
WCPFC. 2016b. Estimates of annual catches in the WCPFC statistical area. Document WCPFC-SC12-2016/ST IP-01.

J.N. Mercado Seafood Supply*

Species scientific name: Thunnus albacares
FAO area: 71
Fishing method: Hand line
Last audit date: 11/03/2017
Next audit within: 01/05/2020
Status: Approved
Audit Report
Corrective Actions
Philippines-Yellowfin tuna – Hand line – FAO 71
Species: Thunnus albacares
Gear type: Hand line
Fishing Area: FAO Area 71 Pacific Southwest
Fishery management: The Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) is the competent regional organisation for fisheries management in the region (FAO Statistical Area 71). WCP Ocean stocks are assessed by the Secretariat of the Pacific Communities and the results are reviewed by the scientific committee, which makes recommendations to the WCPFC.
The Philippines Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) also conducts stock assessment studies through the National Stock Assessment Program and releases annual fishery data through the Philippines Fisheries Profile.
The Philippines, as a member of the WCPFC, adheres to conservation and management measures in mitigating the impacts of tuna fishing on non-target species and prohibition of fishing on data buoys.
Stock status: The Western and Central Pacific yellowfin tuna stock is not overfished and overfishing is not occurring, based on 2016 data.
The latest (2012) estimates of spawning biomass for yellowfin tuna are above the level that supports MSY. Current (2015) catches are below MSY and overfishing is not occurring.
Habitat impact: The fleet uses pelagic hand lines that do not interact with the seabed and the benthic communities, hence its impact on the habitat is not significant.
Bycatch: Hand line is a highly selective gear with negligible bycatch. Accidental bycatch consists in marine mammals, turtles, dolphins and sharks. These are considered illegal catch and are returned to the sea when caught. Furthermore, hand line fishing uses barbless hooks that allow accidentally caught animals to have a higher chance of survival when returned at sea.
Hand line tuna fishery in the Philippines catches about 15% of non-target species including marlin, swordfish and sailfish that have economic value and are not discarded.
Discards: Discards are reported at landing by individual boat owners. The Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources, through the National Stock Assessment Program, collects landings data for the National Statistics and fisheries management and to be integrated into the catch report submitted to WCPFC as part of the obligation of the Philippines as member of the Commission.
Discards in hand line tuna fishing is negligible (<1% of the total catch) as most of accidental bycatch is sold to the local market for human consumption.
References
ISSF. 2016. ISSF Tuna Stock Status Update, 2016: Status of the world fisheries for tuna. ISSF Technical Report 2016-05B. International Seafood Sustainability Foundation, Washington, D.C., USA.
WCPFC. 2016. Executive Summary of the Twelfth regular session of the Scientific Committee. Bali, Indonesia, 3-11 August 2016.
WCPFC. 2016b. Estimates of annual catches in the WCPFC statistical area. Document WCPFC-SC12-2016/ST IP-01.

JAM Seafoods Inc.*

Species scientific name: Thunnus albacares
FAO area: 71
Fishing method: Hand line
Last audit date: 18/04/2017
Next audit within: 08/06/2019
Status: Approved
Audit Report
Corrective Actions
Philippines-Yellowfin tuna – Hand line – FAO 71
Species: Thunnus albacares
Gear type: Hand line
Fishing Area: FAO Area 71 Pacific Southwest
Fishery management: The Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) is the competent regional organisation for fisheries management in the region (FAO Statistical Area 71). WCP Ocean stocks are assessed by the Secretariat of the Pacific Communities and the results are reviewed by the scientific committee, which makes recommendations to the WCPFC.
The Philippines Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) also conducts stock assessment studies through the National Stock Assessment Program and releases annual fishery data through the Philippines Fisheries Profile.
The Philippines, as a member of the WCPFC, adheres to conservation and management measures in mitigating the impacts of tuna fishing on non-target species and prohibition of fishing on data buoys.
Stock status: The Western and Central Pacific yellowfin tuna stock is not overfished and overfishing is not occurring, based on 2016 data.
The latest (2012) estimates of spawning biomass for yellowfin tuna are above the level that supports MSY. Current (2015) catches are below MSY and overfishing is not occurring.
Habitat impact: The fleet uses pelagic hand lines that do not interact with the seabed and the benthic communities, hence its impact on the habitat is not significant.
Bycatch: Hand line is a highly selective gear with negligible bycatch. Accidental bycatch consists in marine mammals, turtles, dolphins and sharks. These are considered illegal catch and are returned to the sea when caught. Furthermore, hand line fishing uses barbless hooks that allow accidentally caught animals to have a higher chance of survival when returned at sea.
Hand line tuna fishery in the Philippines catches about 15% of non-target species including marlin, swordfish and sailfish that have economic value and are not discarded.
Discards: Discards are reported at landing by individual boat owners. The Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources, through the National Stock Assessment Program, collects landings data for the National Statistics and fisheries management and to be integrated into the catch report submitted to WCPFC as part of the obligation of the Philippines as member of the Commission.
Discards in hand line tuna fishing is negligible (<1% of the total catch) as most of accidental bycatch is sold to the local market for human consumption.
References
ISSF. 2016. ISSF Tuna Stock Status Update, 2016: Status of the world fisheries for tuna. ISSF Technical Report 2016-05B. International Seafood Sustainability Foundation, Washington, D.C., USA.
WCPFC. 2016. Executive Summary of the Twelfth regular session of the Scientific Committee. Bali, Indonesia, 3-11 August 2016.
WCPFC. 2016b. Estimates of annual catches in the WCPFC statistical area. Document WCPFC-SC12-2016/ST IP-01.

Tenpoint Manufacturing Corporation*

Species scientific name: Thunnus albacares
FAO area: 71
Fishing method: Hand line
Last audit date: 09/02/2016
Next audit within: 17/05/2019
Status: Approved
Audit Report
Corrective Actions
Philippines-Yellowfin tuna – Hand line – FAO 71
Species: Thunnus albacares
Gear type: Hand line
Fishing Area: FAO Area 71 Pacific Southwest
Fishery management: The Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) is the competent regional organisation for fisheries management in the region (FAO Statistical Area 71). WCP Ocean stocks are assessed by the Secretariat of the Pacific Communities and the results are reviewed by the scientific committee, which makes recommendations to the WCPFC.
The Philippines Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) also conducts stock assessment studies through the National Stock Assessment Program and releases annual fishery data through the Philippines Fisheries Profile.
The Philippines, as a member of the WCPFC, adheres to conservation and management measures in mitigating the impacts of tuna fishing on non-target species and prohibition of fishing on data buoys.
Stock status: The Western and Central Pacific yellowfin tuna stock is not overfished and overfishing is not occurring, based on 2016 data.
The latest (2012) estimates of spawning biomass for yellowfin tuna are above the level that supports MSY. Current (2015) catches are below MSY and overfishing is not occurring.
Habitat impact: The fleet uses pelagic hand lines that do not interact with the seabed and the benthic communities, hence its impact on the habitat is not significant.
Bycatch: Hand line is a highly selective gear with negligible bycatch. Accidental bycatch consists in marine mammals, turtles, dolphins and sharks. These are considered illegal catch and are returned to the sea when caught. Furthermore, hand line fishing uses barbless hooks that allow accidentally caught animals to have a higher chance of survival when returned at sea.
Hand line tuna fishery in the Philippines catches about 15% of non-target species including marlin, swordfish and sailfish that have economic value and are not discarded.
Discards: Discards are reported at landing by individual boat owners. The Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources, through the National Stock Assessment Program, collects landings data for the National Statistics and fisheries management and to be integrated into the catch report submitted to WCPFC as part of the obligation of the Philippines as member of the Commission.
Discards in hand line tuna fishing is negligible (<1% of the total catch) as most of accidental bycatch is sold to the local market for human consumption.
References
ISSF. 2016. ISSF Tuna Stock Status Update, 2016: Status of the world fisheries for tuna. ISSF Technical Report 2016-05B. International Seafood Sustainability Foundation, Washington, D.C., USA.
WCPFC. 2016. Executive Summary of the Twelfth regular session of the Scientific Committee. Bali, Indonesia, 3-11 August 2016.
WCPFC. 2016b. Estimates of annual catches in the WCPFC statistical area. Document WCPFC-SC12-2016/ST IP-01.

P.T. Karyacypta Buanasentosa*

Species scientific names: Thunnus albacares, Thunnus obesus, Katsuwonus pelamis
FAO area: 71
Fishing method: Pole and line
Last audit date: 07/01/2016
Next audit within: 22/09/2019
Status: Approved
Audit Report
Corrective Actions
Thunnus albacares, Thunnus obesus, Katsuwonus pelamis – Pole and line, Purse seine – FAO 71
Species: Thunnus albacares, Thunnus obesus, Katsuwonus pelamis
Gear type: Pole and line, Purse seine
Fishing Area: FAO area 71 (Pacific Western Central)
Stock Status: The Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) is the RFMO encharged of managing the highly migratory fish stocks in the Western and Central Pacific Ocean (FAO Area 71). WCPFC collects and aggregates scientific data of catches and fishing effort, based on which it developes conservation and management measures and resolutions.
As per 2016 stock assessment, the Scientific Committee of WCPFC has determined that the bigeye stock is subject to overfishing and the yellowfin and skipjack stocks are currently being fished at capacity.
Discards, Bycatch and Habitat impact: The gear type used by this fishery does not interact significantly with the seabed and non-target species. The total bycatch reported is less than 8%.
References
https://www.wcpfc.int/about-wcpfc
http://www.wcpfc.int/system/files/Att%20O_CMM%202016-01%20CMM%20for%20Bigeye%20Yellowfin%20and%20Skipjack%20Tuna_p_1.pdf

Frabelle Fishing Corporation*

Species scientific names: Thunnus albacares, Thunnus obesus, Katsuwonus pelamis, Auxis rochei
FAO area: 71
Fishing method: Purse seine
Last audit date: 10/03/2016
Next audit within: 01/06/2019
Status: Approved
Audit Report
Corrective Actions
Thunnus albacares, Thunnus obesus, Katsuwonus pelamis – Pole and line, Purse seine – FAO 71
Species: Thunnus albacares, Thunnus obesus, Katsuwonus pelamis
Gear type: Pole and line, Purse seine
Fishing Area: FAO area 71 (Pacific Western Central)
Stock Status: The Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) is the RFMO encharged of managing the highly migratory fish stocks in the Western and Central Pacific Ocean (FAO Area 71). WCPFC collects and aggregates scientific data of catches and fishing effort, based on which it developes conservation and management measures and resolutions.
As per 2016 stock assessment, the Scientific Committee of WCPFC has determined that the bigeye stock is subject to overfishing and the yellowfin and skipjack stocks are currently being fished at capacity.
Discards, Bycatch and Habitat impact: The gear type used by this fishery does not interact significantly with the seabed and non-target species. The total bycatch reported is less than 8%.
References
https://www.wcpfc.int/about-wcpfc
http://www.wcpfc.int/system/files/Att%20O_CMM%202016-01%20CMM%20for%20Bigeye%20Yellowfin%20and%20Skipjack%20Tuna_p_1.pdf

Phil Union Frozen Foods

Species scientific name: Thunnus albacares
FAO area: 71
Fishing method: Hand line
Last audit date: 15/05/2017
Next audit within: 23/11/2018
Status: Approved
Audit report and corrective actions
Philippines-Yellowfin tuna – Hand line – FAO 71
Species: Thunnus albacares
Gear type: Hand line
Fishing Area: FAO Area 71 Pacific Southwest
Fishery management: The Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) is the competent regional organisation for fisheries management in the region (FAO Statistical Area 71). WCP Ocean stocks are assessed by the Secretariat of the Pacific Communities and the results are reviewed by the scientific committee, which makes recommendations to the WCPFC.
The Philippines Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) also conducts stock assessment studies through the National Stock Assessment Program and releases annual fishery data through the Philippines Fisheries Profile.
The Philippines, as a member of the WCPFC, adheres to conservation and management measures in mitigating the impacts of tuna fishing on non-target species and prohibition of fishing on data buoys.
Stock status: The Western and Central Pacific yellowfin tuna stock is not overfished and overfishing is not occurring, based on 2016 data.
The latest (2012) estimates of spawning biomass for yellowfin tuna are above the level that supports MSY. Current (2015) catches are below MSY and overfishing is not occurring.
Habitat impact: The fleet uses pelagic hand lines that do not interact with the seabed and the benthic communities, hence its impact on the habitat is not significant.
Bycatch: Hand line is a highly selective gear with negligible bycatch. Accidental bycatch consists in marine mammals, turtles, dolphins and sharks. These are considered illegal catch and are returned to the sea when caught. Furthermore, hand line fishing uses barbless hooks that allow accidentally caught animals to have a higher chance of survival when returned at sea.
Hand line tuna fishery in the Philippines catches about 15% of non-target species including marlin, swordfish and sailfish that have economic value and are not discarded.
Discards: Discards are reported at landing by individual boat owners. The Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources, through the National Stock Assessment Program, collects landings data for the National Statistics and fisheries management and to be integrated into the catch report submitted to WCPFC as part of the obligation of the Philippines as member of the Commission.
Discards in hand line tuna fishing is negligible (<1% of the total catch) as most of accidental bycatch is sold to the local market for human consumption.
References
ISSF. 2016. ISSF Tuna Stock Status Update, 2016: Status of the world fisheries for tuna. ISSF Technical Report 2016-05B. International Seafood Sustainability Foundation, Washington, D.C., USA.
WCPFC. 2016. Executive Summary of the Twelfth regular session of the Scientific Committee. Bali, Indonesia, 3-11 August 2016.
WCPFC. 2016b. Estimates of annual catches in the WCPFC statistical area. Document WCPFC-SC12-2016/ST IP-01.

Calvopesca El Salvador

Species scientific names: Thunnus albacares, Thunnus obesus, Katsuwonus pelamis
FAO areas: 77, 87
Fishing method: Purse seine
Last audit date: 27/11/2017
Next audit within: 13/02/2019
Status: Approved
Audit Report
YF, BE, SJ Tuna – Purse seine – FAO 77 and 87
Species: Thunnus albacares, Thunnus obesus, Katsuwonus pelamis
Gear type: Purse seine
Fishing Area: FAO Area 77 and 87
Fishery management:
The Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC) is the competent regional organisation for tuna fisheries management in the FAO fishing area 87, while the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) is responsible for the conservation and management of tuna and other marine resources in FAO area 77. Western Pacific Ocean stocks are assessed by SPC and the results are reviewed by the Scientific Committee which makes recommendations to the WCPFC.
Stock Status:
Eastern Pacific Ocean (FAO 87)
According to the IATTC, the fishing mortality rate for skipjack and bigeye stock is below FMSY. For the yellowfin tuna, the fishing effort is estimated to be below the level that would support the MSY. Skipjack and bigeye biomasses are above BMSY. There is uncertainty about recent levels of recruitment and biomass of yellowfin tuna, although it is estimated that, if fishing effort is maintained at the present levels, both spawning biomass and catches are predicted to increase.
Western and Central Pacific Ocean (FAO 77)
The last Scientific Committee meeting was held in 2016.
The Western Pacific bigeye tuna stock is overfished, with biomass below the limit reference point established by WCPFC. The ratio of Fcurrent/FMSY is estimated at 1.57. The 2012 ratio of spawning biomass SSBcurrent/SSBMSY in the base model is estimated at 0.77. This indicates that that the stock is in an overfished state.
The Western and Central Pacific yellowfin tuna stock is not overfished and overfishing is not occurring (SSBcurrent/SSBMSY = 1.24, range between 1.05 and 1.51 across different models). Last yellowfin assessment was conducted in 2014.
Skipjack tuna fishing mortality rates are estimated to have decreased moderately in the last several years. The ratio Frecent/FMSY is estimated to be 0.45, indicating that overfishing is not occurring. The stock is not in an overfished state as spawning biomass (in 2015) is above the SSBMSY level (SSBlatest/SSBMSY = 2.56).
Bycatch:
Purse seining on free schools has little impact on non-target species
References:
IATTC, Stock Assessment Report 16 https://www.iattc.org/StockAssessmentReports/StockAssessmentReport16ENG.htm
ISSF. 2016. ISSF Tuna Stock Status Update, 2016: Status of the world fisheries for tuna. ISSF Technical Report 2016-05B. International Seafood Sustainability Foundation, Washington, D.C., USA.
IATTC SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE 2ND MEETING La Jolla, California (USA) 9-12 May 2011 Michael G. Hinton and Mark N. Maunder.

Transmarina C.A.

Species scientific names: Thunnus albacares, Thunnus obesus, Katsuwonus pelamis, Thunnus alalunga
FAO area: 87
Fishing methods: Purse seine and long line
Last audit date: 10/07/2016
Next audit within: 09/07/2017
Status: Surveillance audit in progress
Audit Report
Ecuador – Tuna – Purse seine & Long line fleets – FAO 87
Species: Thunnus albacares, Thunnus obesus, Katsuwonus pelamis, Thunnus alalunga
Gear type: Purse seine, long line
Fishing Area: FAO Area 87 Pacific Southeast
Fishery management: The Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC) is the competent regional organisation for fisheries management in the region (FAO area 87), responsible for the conservation and management of tuna and other marine resources in the Eastern Pacific Ocean (EPO). EPO stocks are assessed by the IATTC staff, who makes recommendations to the IATTC. The Scientific Advisory Committee can also make recommendations to the IATTC.
Stock Status:
According to the IATTC, the fishing mortality rate for Skipjack and Bigeye stock is below FMSY. For the Yellowfin tuna, the fishing effort is estimated to be below the level that would support the MSY. Skipjack and bigeye biomasses are above BMSY. There is uncertainty about recent levels of recruitment and biomass of yellowfin tuna, although it is estimated that, if fishing effort is maintained at the present levels, both spawning biomass and catches are predicted to increase.
According to the most recent stock assessment (2012), the fishing mortality reference point for albacore tuna in the South Pacific is estimated to be at low risk of overfishing. The total biomass has been reduced to around 82% (62%–93%) of unfished levels, while the spawning biomass (mature females) has been reduced to 63% (35%–80%) of unfished levels. Both of these are considered moderate levels of depletion. The ratios of the current total biomass and spawning biomass to that needed to produce the maximum sustainable yield (Bcurrent/BMSY = 1.6 (1.4–1.9) and SBcurrent/SBMSY = 2.6 (1.5-5.2)) are both above 1.
Bycatch: The fleet follows procedures to prevent bycatch of endangered species. Endangered species accidentally caught are released alive. Independent monitors operate onboard each approved vessel.
The most commonly bycaught species by purse seiners and longliners are mahi mahi (Coryphaena hyppurus), swordfish (Xiphias gladius), and blue shark (Prionace glauca).
According to the most  updated assessment (2014), the fishing mortality rate of blue shark was around 34% of that needed to produce the maximum sustainable yield (ISC 2014b). Therefore overfishing is not occurring.
Fishing mortality rates for mahi mahi in the EPO are not known, but the IATTC is in the beginning stages of assessing them. IUCN does not consider there to be any major threats to mahi mahi from commercial fishing (College et al. 2011). Preliminary analysis for the planned assessment of mahi mahi in the EPO shows variable but somewhat steady catch per unit effort trends in abundance (IATTC 2013).
Swordfish stocks are healthy in the northeastern Pacific and southeastern Pacific, as the stocks are not overfished and overfishing is not occurring and biomass is greater than the biomass at which maximum sustainable yield is produced.
References:
IATTC, Stock Assessment Report 16 https://www.iattc.org/StockAssessmentReports/StockAssessmentReport16ENG.htm
ISSF. 2016. ISSF Tuna Stock Status Update, 2016: Status of the world fisheries for tuna. ISSF Technical Report 2016-05B. International Seafood Sustainability Foundation, Washington, D.C., USA.
IATTC SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE 2ND MEETING La Jolla, California (USA) 9-12 May 2011  Michael G. Hinton and Mark N. Maunder.

Global Sea Foods*

Species scientific name: Thunnus albacares
FAO area: 57
Fishing method: Hand line
Last audit date: 26/02/2015
Next audit within: 26/02/2018
Status: Suspended
Audit Report
Sri Lanka – Hand line – Thunnus albacares – FAO 57 (Indian Ocean, Eastern)

Fishery client: Global Sea Foods (Pvt) Ltd.
Website: www.gsffish.com
Fishing area: FAO 57, Eastern Indian Ocean waters.
Fishing vessels: The Company has a fleet of ___ vessels.
Vessels audited on site as fleet samples: A-0229 CHW; A-0191 CHW; A-0662 CHW; A-0398 CHW; A-0652 CHW; A-0010 CHW; -A-0833 MTR; A-1348 MTR.
Fishing method: Hand line.
Certified species: Scientific name: Thunnus albacares;
Common name: Yellowfin Tuna.

Management summary
The Ministry of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Development (MFARD) is the agency that manage fisheries in Sri Lanka. Fisheries activities are planned, administrated and monitored under the guidance of the Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (DFAR). There is regulation from Local Authority emphasizing only swordfish from 15 to 50 kg can be caught. The government provides a logbook for each vessel.

Stock status summary
The Indian Ocean Tuna Commission (IOTC) is an Intergovernmental Organisation responsible for the management of tuna and tuna-like species in the Indian Ocean. According to IOTC, available data show a great uncertainty. Nonetheless, fishing mortality is lower than mortality at Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY). Even so, a precautionary approach is recommended.

Bycatch / discards
Bycatch species are not included in the IUCN Red list. The company has given training to fishermen in order to prevent accidental bycatch of endangered species. Discarding percentage is less than 8%. All bycatch is recorded in the logbook. The Earth Island Institute approved the company for Dolphin-Safe certification.

Habitat Impact
The government and competent authority have given advice to skippers regarding protected habitat areas. The fleet operate from 300 to 400 km from the shore, with no evidence of gears that can damage the seabed, spawning and nursery grounds.

Social Accountability performance
The fleet complies with the human rights and Sri Lankan labour regulations.

Conclusion with reasons for approval
The fleet complies with Friend of the Sea requirements, without any non-conformity.

Lihini Seafoods

Species scientific name: Thunnus albacares
FAO area: 57
Fishing method: Longline
Last audit date: 31/08/2017
Next audit within: 05/01/2019
Status: Approved
Audit report and Corrective actions
Company Requesting the audit: Lihini Seafoods Pvt Ltd
Approved targeted species: Yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares), Swordfish (Xiphias gladius)
Fishing method: handline
Fishing area: FAO 57 (Eastern Indian Ocean)
Fishing vessels: 79 vessels unloading in the main fishing harbors in Sri Lanka
Stock status
Yellofin tuna:  IOTC report published in November 2012 (IOTC–2012–WPTT14–38 Rev_1) shows that the actual trend of the stock is still positive even if a precautionary approach is still recommended. Biomass level can be estimated with a great uncertainty. Fishing mortality is at high level but it is decreasing due to the less intensive pirates activities and industrial fisheries. Anyway a precautionary approach is recommended.
Swordfish: IOTC scientific assessment states that  F<Fmsy Fishing mortality is lower than mortality at MSY while the Biomass level is above the MSY. Scientists declared that the stock  is divided and that the south-western is interested by a weak population decrease in the last years so that a precautionary approach is recommended.
Discard: according to the IOTC studies for discard in association to handline fishing activities and to the vessels logbook information discard is negligible and well below the defined limit of the 4%.

VS Seafood*

Species scientific names: Thunnus albacares, Thunnus obesus
FAO area: 57
Fishing method: Long line
Last audit date: 23/12/2015
Next audit within: 22/12/2018
Status: Suspended
Audit Report
Sri Lanka – Long line – Thunnus albacares, Thunnus obesus – FAO 57 (Indian Ocean, Eastern)

Fishery client: VS Seafood (Pvt) Ltd.
Website: www.vsseafood.com
Fishing area: FAO 57, Eastern Indian Ocean waters.
Fishing vessels: The Company has a fleet of ___ vessels.
Vessels audited on site as fleet samples: IMUL –A-0612 CHW; IMUL-A-0102 CBO.
Fishing method: Long line.
Certified species: Scientific name / Common name
Thunnus albacares / Yellowfin Tuna;
Thunnus obesus / Big eye tuna.

Management summary
The Ministry of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Development (MFARD) is the agency that manage fisheries in Sri Lanka. Fisheries activities are planned, administrated and monitored under the guidance of the Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (DFAR). A regulation from Local Authority emphasizes a minimum catch size of 25 kg for Yellowfin Tuna and Big eye tuna. There is a quota system for providing license to vessels. Navy and fisheries Officer monitor logbook data.

Stock status summary
The Indian Ocean Tuna Commission (IOTC) is an Intergovernmental Organisation responsible for the management of tuna and tuna-like species in the Indian Ocean. According to IOTC data, in the case of T. obesus, the stock is not overexploited and overfished. On the other hand, in the case of T. albacares, stock in the Indian Ocean was considered overexploited. Thus, as determined by the auditor, Friend of the Sea certification of Yellowfin Tuna from the Indian Ocean will be valid only for products fished until 31st of December 2016. After this period, the certification will be valid only if IOTC confirms the full compliance of the Indian Ocean stock or the audited fleet show a reduction of 20% in the catch levels of 2014, as recommended in the IOTC stock assessment in 2015.

Bycatch / discards
Accidental catches are released alive to the sea at the time of the catch. The fleet is keeping records in the logbook and no accidental catches are included in the IUCN Red list. The level of discards does not exceed 8% of the total catch.

Habitat Impact
Each vessel has a Vessel Monitoring System (VMS), which is monitored by government authorities in order to control the intrusion of Marine Protected Areas. The fishery occurs approximately 400 to 450 km from the Sri Lanka shore. The long line is used at about 20 meters depth and there are specific bait to reduction of accidental catches and limit to specific catch.

Social Accountability performance
The fleet complies with the human rights and Sri Lankan labour regulations.

Conclusion with reasons for approval
The fleet complies with Friend of the Sea requirements, without any non-conformity.

Sapmer SA*

Species scientific names: Thunnus albacares, Katsuwonus pelamis, Thunnus obesus
FAO areas: 51, 57
Fishing method: Hand line
Last audit date: 29/04/2016
Next audit within: 29/04/2019
Status: Approved
Audit Report
Corrective Actions
Sapmer-YF, BE, SJ tuna-Purse seine-FAO 51,57
Company Requesting the Audit: Sapmer
Approved Target Species: Thunnus albacares, Katsuwonus pelamis, Thunnus obesus
Fishing Method: Purse seine
Fishing Area: FAO 51 and 57
Stock Status: Yellowfin, Skipjack and Bigeye tuna are all considered Not Overexploited by the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission http://www.iotc.org/files/proceedings/2011/sc/IOTC-2011-WPTT13-R[E].pdf
Discard: Level of discard is much less than 8% and bycaught species are not listed in the IUCN Redlist as vulnerable or worse
Habitat Impact: Fishing methods do not impact the seabed or critical habitat.
Video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5zQl_QNyfa0&feature=youtu.be

Ensis Fisheries PVT Ltd*

Species scientific name: Thunnus albacares
FAO area: 51
Fishing method: Hand line
Last audit date: 12/11/2014
Next audit within: 12/11/2017
Status: Approved
Audit Report
Maldives – Hand line, Pole and Line – Thunnus albacares, Katsuwonus pelamis – FAO 51 (Indian Ocean, Western)

Fishery client: Ensis fisheries Pvt Ltd.
Website: www.ensisfisheries.com
Fishing area: FAO 51, Western Indian Ocean Waters.
Fishing vessels: The Company has a fleet of ___ vessels.
Vessels audited on site as fleet samples: P3804B-01-10-T; P9549A-01-01-R.
Fishing method: Hand line, Pole and Line.
Certified species: Scientific name / Common name
Thunnus albacares / Yellowfin Tuna;
Katsuwonus pelamis / Skipjack Tuna.

Management summary
The Ministry of Fisheries and Agriculture (MoFA) is the government agency that manages fisheries in Maldives. The Fisheries Management Agency (FMA) is the section of MoFA responsible for the management and sustainable use of fisheries resources within the country. Measures are in place to establish the fisheries management and development framework for the Maldives according to an International Plan of Actions. A regulation from Local Authority emphasizes a minimum catch size of 18 kg and above for Yellowfin Tuna and 1.2 kg and above for Skipjack Tuna.

Stock status summary
Data from the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission (IOTC) was used to assess stock status of Yellowfin Tuna. According to IOTC, available data show a great uncertainty. Nonetheless, fishing mortality is lower than mortality at Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY). Even so, a precautionary approach is recommended. Data from the International Seafood Sustainability Foundation (ISSF) was used to assess stock status of Skipjack Tuna. According to ISSF, the stock is not overexploited and overfished.

Bycatch / discards
There is no evidence of accidental captures of shark fins, marine mammals, turtles and species included in the IUCN Red list. According to the law, any bycatch have to be recorded in the logbook.
Only gills and guts of Yellowfin Tuna are discarded in the deep sea. The level of discards does not exceed 8% of the total catch.

Habitat Impact 
The fleet only operates in the fishing areas where the Maldivian government has authorized, 40 to 70 miles from the shore. Fishermen use only hand line, pole and line. According to the auditor, there is no evidence of use of banned gears, as well as impact of spawning and nursery ground. The Earth Island Institute approved the company for Dolphin-Safe certification.

Social Accountability performance
The fleet complies with the human rights and Maldivian labour regulations.

Jude Foods India*

Species scientific name: Thunnus albacares
FAO areas: 51, 57
Fishing method: Long line
Last audit date: 23/02/2016
Next audit within: 09/08/2019
Status: Suspended
Audit Report
Corrective Actions
India – Long line – Thunnus albacares – FAO 51 (Indian Ocean, Western) and FAO 57 FAO 57 (Indian Ocean, Eastern)

Fishery client: Jude Foods India Private Limited.
Website: www.judefoodsindia.com
Fishing area: FAO 51, Western Indian Ocean Waters.
FAO 57, Eastern Indian Ocean waters.
Fishing vessels: The Company has a fleet of 29 vessels.
Vessels audited on site as fleet samples: IND-AP-V1-MM-1676; IND-AP-V1-MM-1915; IND-TN-15-MM-947; IND-TN-06-MM-1019; IND-TN-15-MM-4595; IND-TN-15-MM3983.
Fishing method: Long line.
Certified species: Scientific name: Thunnus albacares;
Common name: Yellowfin Tuna.

Management summary
The Department of Animal Husbandry Dairying & Fisheries (DADF) is responsible for matters relating to livestock production, preservation, protection and improvement of stocks in India. It also looks after all matters pertaining to fishing and Fisheries Development Board. In Indian Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), Yellowfin Tuna fishery is not managed by Total allowable catches (TACs) and there is no legal minimum size limit. Nonetheless, the Central Marine Fisheries Research institute recommends a catch length of 50 cm or over the length of the fork.

Stock status summary
Yellowfin Tuna sustainability for Indian fish catches needs to be considered for Indian EEZ rather than Indian Ocean as a whole. Data from the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission (IOTC) was used to assess stock status of Yellowfin Tuna. According to IOTC, the Yellowfin Tuna catch from the Indian EEZ ranges from 16349 MT to 25357 MT between 2008 and 2012, against a potential of 80000 MT. This indicates that India presently harvests about 1/5th of the potential within the Maximum Sustainable Yield. Thus, the stock is not overfished in the Indian EEZ.

Bycatch / discards
Common bycatch species are Xiphias gladius, Makaira indica, Istiophorus Platypterus, and Coryphaena hippurus. These are not included in the IUCN Red List and are not considered as endangered species by local regulatory authority. Juveniles catch is controlled by the hook size. Any fish other than banned under the Indian law can be brought ashore for human consumption.

Habitat Impact
India has 24 Marine Protected Areas identified. The company is aware of these areas, thus fishing is not done on protected habitat. Yellowfin Tuna are caught with long line, which is a passive gear with no negative interaction with the seabed.

Social Accountability performance
The fleet complies with the human rights and Indian labour regulations.

Conclusion with reasons for approval
Despite a major non-conformity (related to the absence of Dolphin-Safe certification by the Earth Island Institute), the fleet complied with Friend of the Sea requirements. The procedure of non-conformity was closed when the company sent a document showing that the irregularity pointed out by the auditor was being corrected.

Sovetco*

Species scientific names: Thunnus albacares, Thunnus alalunga, Thunnus obesus, Katsuwonus pelamis
FAO areas: 34, 47, 51, 57
Fishing method: Purse seine
Last audit date: 07/09/2015
Next audit within: 01/10/2018
France – Compagnie Française du Thon Océanique Sovetco – Purse seine – Thunnus albacares, Thunnus obesus, Katsuwonus pelamis, Thunnus alalunga- FAO 34 & 47- FAO 51 & 57  
Company Requesting the Audit: Compagnie Française du Thon Océanique (Sovetco)
Approved Target Species: Yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares); Bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus); Skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis), Albacore tuna (Thunnus alalunga –only in FAO areas 51 & 57)
Fishing Method: Purse Seine
Fishing Area: FAO areas 34 & 47 (Atlantic Ocean), FAO areas 51 & 57 (Indian Ocean)
Approved Vessels
Stock Status:
Atlantic Ocean
Yellowfin – YFT is strictly monitored by ICCAT. The stock resulted to be overfished in 2010, this lead to the necessity in implementing a management plan by defining a maximum catch level that was expected to lead to a recovery level by 2016 with a 60% probability. The situation follows by being managed with a precautionary approach, and the scientific community also pays attention to the quota harvested by using FADs. At the moment the Biomass level results to be below the level at MSY yield but the statistical range is 0.61-1.12
Skipjack – the last scientific advice shows that this species is not overfished nor is experiencing overfishing as the last data state that F2013<FMSY while the biomass level is above that at MSY B2013>BMSY
Bigeye – the management plan applied promotes a stock growth and chances for a further increase in the stock biomass. The actual median value is just above the BMSY value while the fishing effort is below FMSY. Due to the great uncertainty in assessment results a precautionary approach is still recommended with a total future catch that cannot exceed 85,000 t.
Indian Ocean
Yellowfin – the stock status is defined on the basis of the data collected until 2012 and the indicators adopted by 2014; the last observations indicate that landings of YFT are increasing so that it is difficult to define a potential overfishing status. A new stock assessment will be run, while at the moment IOTC is still considering the stock as in a healthy status
Skipjack – the last stock assessment confirms the previous trend so that the stock population results to be stable. The statistics results show that the biomass is well above the level that can produce the MSY while catches are still lower so that the stock seems to be well managed
Bigeye – this species has not been submitted to a new stock assessment in 2014 so that the previous one is still valid. The biomass level identifies a stable trend in the stock size which can produce the MSY in the long term while the fishing effort is below the MSY based reference level
Albacore tuna – this species have been recently caught by the Indonesian, Taiwan and Chinese longline fisheries. It seems that the recent catches are approaching the MSY levels but the fishing mortality estimated as F2012<FMSY is 0.69 while the biomass values is above the biomass level which can produce the MSY
References
https://www.iccat.int/en/assess.htm
http://www.iotc.org/meetings/2nd-sciencestock-assessment-workshop
* Companies that have applied for certification before the current accredited system.