Other Species

Fin Fish

Ferguson Australia

Species scientific name: Platycephalus conatus
FAO area: 57
Fishing method: Bottom trawl
Last audit date: 19/12/2016
Next audit within: 18/06/2018
Status: Approved
Audit Report
Corrective Actions
Australia – Bottom trawl – Platycephalus conatus – FAO 57 (Indian Ocean, Eastern)

Fishery client: Ferguson Australia Proprietary Ltd.
Website: www.fergusonaustralia.com
Fishing area: FAO 57, Southern Australia Waters.
Fishing vessels: The Company has a fleet of 60 vessels used in the fishing of several species.
Vessels audited on site as fleet samples: M341-1; Explorer S; M342; N070; N004; N040; M184; M368; M404.
Fishing method: Bottom trawl.
Certified species: Scientific name: Platycephalus conatus;
                                  Common name: Deepwater Flathead.

Management summary
The Australian Fish Monitoring Authority (AFMA) and Primary Industries and Regions South Australia (PIRSA) monitor the fisheries in the Southern Australia Waters. Quotas manage the Flathead trawl fishery and there is a reference limit so that the stock biomass does not fall below 42% of its virgin biomass. Total allowable catches (TACs) for Flathead are based on scientific information, stock assessments and catch change per unit of effort (CPUE). In addition, the Flathead fishery is required to use a logbook for every trip and there is a minimum capture size of 30 cm to be respected.

Stock status summary
According to the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation’s Status of Key Australian Fish stocks 2014, the stock of Deepwater Flathead in the Southern Australia Waters is not considered overexploited. Thus, the fishery is considered sustainable.

Bycatch / discards
Bycatch include at least one IUCN species considered vulnerable, the School shark (Galeorhinus galeus), which is regularly captured. All discards are recorded in the logbook and levels are quite high around 9%.

Habitat Impact
There are newly created marine parks and these are all controlled by the state. In order to control illegal fishing, vessels are monitored via Vessel Monitoring System (VMS). Flathead are caught with bottom trawl. The company provided publications on the impact of trawling in the area and showed that the impact on the habitat is under control. In order to recover the ecosystem, the impact is managed through a series of closures for certain areas.

Social Accountability performance
The fleet complies with the human rights and Australian regulations.

Conclusion with reasons for approval
The fleet complies with Friend of the Sea requirements, without any major non-conformities for Flathead fishery. The auditor pointed out as a minor non-compliance the level of discards of the Flathead fishery, which is around 9%, and required operators to record all species caught accidentally.

Ferguson Australia

Species scientific name: Mustelus antarcticus
FAO area: 57
Fishing method: Longline
Last audit date: 19/12/2016
Next audit within: 18/06/2018
Status: Approved
Audit Report
Corrective Actions
Australia – Long line – Mustelus antarcticus – FAO 57 (Indian Ocean, Eastern)

Fishery client: Ferguson Australia Proprietary Ltd.
Website: www.fergusonaustralia.com
Fishing area: FAO 57, Southern Australia Waters.
Fishing vessels: The Company has a fleet of 60 vessels used in the fishing of several species.
Vessels audited on site as fleet samples: M341-1; Explorer S; M342; N070; N004; N040; M184; M368; M404.
Fishing method: Long line.
Certified species: Scientific name: Mustelus antarcticus;
                                  Common name: Gummy shark.

Management summary
The Australian Fish Monitoring Authority (AFMA) and Primary Industries and Regions South Australia (PIRSA) monitor the fisheries in the Southern Australia Waters. The Gummy Shark fishery is managed by a Total allowable catch (TAC) based on scientific information, stock assessments and catch change per unit of effort (CPUE). The TAC is set with a harvest strategy specifically designed to keep the fishery operating at a level consistent with the Maximum Sustainable Yield. In addition, there is a minimum capture size of 45 cm to be respected.

Stock status summary
According to the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation’s Status of Key Australian Fish stocks 2014, the stock of Gummy shark in the Southern Australia Waters is not considered overexploited. Thus, the fishery is considered sustainable.

Bycatch / discards
Long line is a highly selective fishing gear. Thus, bycatch is low. This can include at least one IUCN species considered vulnerable, the School shark (Galeorhinus galeus). Nonetheless, as most of the vessels that catch Gummy sharks fish in shallow waters, interaction with school sharks is very rare. Accidental catches are usually returned alive and relatively unharmed. All bycatch that is not discarded is recorded for each trip in the sales invoices. However, in the case of non-landed bycatches, nothing is recorded because it is not a legal requirement.

Habitat Impact
There are newly created marine parks and these are all controlled by the state. In order to control illegal fishing, vessels are monitored via Vessel Monitoring System (VMS). Gummy shark are caught with longline or drop lines, which are passive gears or have no negative interaction with the seabed.

Social Accountability performance
The fleet complies with the human rights and Australian regulations.

Conclusion with reasons for approval
The fleet complies with Friend of the Sea requirements, without any major non-conformities for Gummy shark fishery.

Ferguson Australia

Species scientific name: Nelusetta ayraud
FAO area: 57
Fishing method: Trap
Last audit date: 19/12/2016
Next audit within: 18/06/2018
Status: Approved
Audit Report
Corrective Actions
Australia – Trap – Nelusetta ayraud – FAO 57 (Indian Ocean, Eastern)

Fishery client: Ferguson Australia Proprietary Ltd.
Website: www.fergusonaustralia.com
Fishing area: FAO 57, Southern Australia Waters.
Fishing vessels: The Company has a fleet of 60 vessels used in the fishing of several species.
Vessels audited on site as fleet samples: M341-1; Explorer S; M342; N070; N004; N040; M184; M368; M404.
Fishing method: Trap.
Certified species: Scientific name: Nelusetta ayraud;
                                  Common name: Ocean jacket.

Management summary
The Australian Fish Monitoring Authority (AFMA) and Primary Industries and Regions South Australia (PIRSA) monitor the fisheries in the Southern Australia Waters. Ocean jackets are managed through the monitoring of catch and discard rates, since it is a bycatch fishery. Therefore, fishing effort is low and the stock is sustainable. Still, fishing is likely to be done at a level that would be considered preventive. There is no minimum capture size to be respected.


Stock status summary
According to the Australian Fish Fisheries Management Authority, the stock of Ocean jacket in the Southern Australia Waters is not considered overexploited. Thus, the fishery is considered sustainable.


Bycatch / discards
The species audited is from a bycatch fishery. Therefore, the species is landed and commercialized. All captured Ocean jackets are recorded in the sales invoices.


Habitat Impact
There are newly created marine parks and these are all controlled by the state. In order to control illegal fishing, vessels are monitored via Vessel Monitoring System (VMS). Ocean jackets are caught with trap, which is a passive gear or have no negative interaction with the seabed.


Social Accountability performance
The fleet complies with the human rights and Australian regulations.


Conclusion with reasons for approval
The fleet complies with Friend of the Sea requirements, without any major non-conformities for Ocean jacket fishery.
 

Ferguson Australia

Species scientific name: Hyporhamphus melanochir 
FAO area: 57
Fishing method: Cast net
Last audit date: 19/12/2016
Next audit within: 18/06/2018
Status: Approved
Audit Report
Corrective Actions
Australia – Dabnets – Hyporhamphus melanochir – FAO 57 (Indian Ocean, Eastern)

Fishery client: Ferguson Australia Proprietary Ltd.
Website: www.fergusonaustralia.com
Fishing area: FAO 57, Southern Australia Waters.
Fishing vessels: The Company has a fleet of 60 vessels used in the fishing of several species.
Vessels audited on site as fleet samples: M341-1; Explorer S; M342; N070; N004; N040; M184; M368; M404.
Fishing method: Dabnets.
Certified species: Scientific name: Hyporhamphus melanochir;
                                  Common name: Southern Garfish.

Management summary
The Australian Fish Monitoring Authority (AFMA) and Primary Industries and Regions South Australia (PIRSA) monitor the fisheries in the Southern Australia Waters. Southern Garfish fishery is not managed by Total allowable catches (TACs). Nonetheless, other measures are in place to reduce exploitation from 69 to ≤ 30% by 2020. These measures includes temporal area closures to protect stock in critical times, increase in the minimum capture size (25 cm), and an increase in the minimum mesh size from 30 to 32 mm.

Stock status summary
According to the Fishery Assessment Report to PIRSA Fisheries and Aquaculture from 2016, the stock of Southern Garfish in the region is quite variable among the collection points. In the South East and West Coast, data is limited. In the Northern Spencer Gulf, stock status is defined as transitional recovery. In the Southern Spencer Gulf and Southern Gulf St. Vincent, stock status is defined as sustainable. On the other hand, in the Northern Gulf St. Vincent, the stock status is defined as overfished.

Bycatch / discards
Garfish are caught with Dabnets (a type of hand net). There is a limit of 1 meter in diameter for these nets. However, smaller nets are generally used so that fishermen can be more selective. The minimum mesh size is 32 mm for standard knot and 34 mm for knotless. Bycatch is low, but non-landed species are not recorded because it is not a legal requirement.

Habitat Impact
There are newly created marine parks and these are all controlled by the state. In order to control illegal fishing, vessels are monitored via Vessel Monitoring System (VMS). Garfish are caught with Dabnets, which is a passive gear or have no negative interaction with the seabed.

Social Accountability performance
The fleet complies with the human rights and Australian regulations.

Conclusion with reasons for approval
Concerns related to the stock status of Southern Garfish originated restrictions for certification. Ferguson Australia can use the logo of Friend of the Sea only for Southern Garfish fished in the Northern Spencer Gulf, Southern Spencer Gulf, Southern Gulf St. Vincent, South East and West Coast. The company is not allowed to use the logo for catches made in the Northern Gulf St. Vincent.

Ferguson Australia

Species scientific name: Sillaginoides punctatus
FAO area: 57
Fishing method: Hand line
Last audit date: 19/12/2016
Next audit within: 18/06/2018
Status: Approved
Audit Report
Corrective Actions
Australia – Hand line – Sillaginoides punctatus – FAO 57 (Indian Ocean, Eastern)

Fishery client: Ferguson Australia Proprietary Ltd.
Website: www.fergusonaustralia.com
Fishing area: FAO 57, Southern Australia Waters.
Fishing vessels: The Company has a fleet of 60 vessels used in the fishing of several species
Vessels udited on site as fleet samples: M341-1; Explorer S; M342; N070; N004; N040; M184; M368; M404.
Fishing method: Hand line.
Certified species: Scientific name: Sillaginoides punctatus;
Common name: King George whiting.
Management summary
The Australian Fish Monitoring Authority (AFMA) and Primary Industries and Regions South Australia (PIRSA) monitor the fisheries in the Southern Australia Waters. King George whiting fishery is not managed by Total allowable catches (TACs). Nonetheless, other measures are in place to manage the fishery such as: reduced numbers of fishing licenses; limit of 2 lines per fisherman with a maximum of three hooks per line; minimum catch size of 32 cm; and area closures.
Stock status summary
According to the Fishery Assessment Report to PIRSA Fisheries and Aquaculture from 2014, the stock of King George whiting in the West Coast is not considered overexploited. Thus, the fishery in the West Coast is considered sustainable. On the other hand, in the Spencer Gulf and Gulf St. Vincent/Kangaroo Island, the stock status is defined as transitional declining. Thus, in these fishing areas, stock levels are considered outside the Maximum Sustainable Yield.
Bycatch / discards
Hand line is a highly selective fishing gear. Thus, bycatch is low. Accidental catches are usually returned alive and relatively unharmed. All bycatch that is not discarded is recorded for each trip in the sales invoices. However, in the case of non-landed bycatches, nothing is recorded because it is not a legal requirement.
Habitat Impact
There are newly created marine parks and these are all controlled by the state. In order to control illegal fishing, vessels are monitored via Vessel Monitoring System (VMS). The hand line is considered a passive fishing gear or with no negative interaction with the seabed.

Social Accountability performance

The fleet complies with the human rights and Australian regulations.
Conclusion with reasons for approval
Concerns related to the stock status of King George whiting originated restrictions for certification. Ferguson Australia can use the logo of Friend of the Sea only for King George whiting fished in the West Coast. The company is not allowed to use the logo for catches made in the following fishing areas: Spencer Gulf, Gulf St. Vincent/Kangaroo Island.

Puerto de Celeiro*

Species scientific name: Merluccius merluccius
FAO area: 27
Fishing method: Longline
Last audit date: 18/10/2016
Next audit within: 18/10/2019
Status: Approved
Audit Report
European hake – Long line – FAO 27
Species: Merluccius merluccius
Gear type: Long line
Fishing Area: FAO Area 27 Atlantic North East – in subareas 4, 6, and 7 and divisions 3.a, 8.a–b, and 8.d. Northern stock (Greater North Sea, Celtic Seas, and the northern Bay of Biscay)
Fishery management: The North East Atlantic Fisheries Commission (NEAFC) is the competent regional organisation for fisheries management in the region (FAO Statistical Area 27). NEAFC takes advice from the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES), the intergovernmental organisation conducting research on marine resources in the North Atlantic.
Stock status: According to ICES (2016), the stock of European hake in subareas 4, 6, and 7 and divisions 3.a, 8.a–b, and 8.d is at full reproductive capacity and is harvested sustainably (based on data from 2015).
Habitat impact: The fleet uses long lines set at a minimum distance of 10 meters from the sea bottom, without interacting with the seabed and the benthic communities.
Bycatch: Fishing activities take place at night to minimise the risk of the interaction with seabirds. Moreover, the fleet is equipped with tori lines to reduce the accidental bycatch of seabirds when fishing during the day. Long lines carry additional weights for the same purpose.

Insung Corporation*

Species scientific name: Merluccius hubbsi
FAO area: 41
Fishing method: Midwater trawl
Last audit date: 04/11/2016
Next audit within: 06/12/2019
Status: Approved
Audit Report
Republic of Korea – Midwater trawl – Merluccius hubbsi – FAO 41 (Atlantic, Southwest)

Fishery client: IN SUNG CORPORATION.
Fishing area: FAO 41, Southwest Atlantic.
Fishing vessels: The Company has a fleet of 11 vessels.
Vessel audited on site as fleet sample: IMO 7042538.
Fishing method: Midwater trawl.
Certified species: Scientific name: Merluccius hubbsi;
Common name: Hake.

Management summary
The Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries (MOMAF) is the executive agency of the Republic of Korea responsible for planning and implementing fisheries policy and general fisheries management. Korean fishing fleets operating far from their national waters must also comply with international law. By Korean law, vessels must have a Vessel Monitoring System (VMS). Every 24 hours, the Fisheries Monitoring System makes an automatic report. Measures to protect fish stock, such as limited licenses, restrictions on size and other dimensions of each fishing unit, size selectivity measures, and spatial and seasonal closures are in place.
Stock status summary
According to the “Reporte Merluza.pdf”, it is estimated that the stock of Hake is about 290 thousand tons. There is no evidence that the stock status of this species is overexploited and overfished. Thus, the fishery management indicates to be compatible with the maintenance of the fish stock.
Bycatch / discards
Fishing operation and nets are designed not to discard. Speed fishing gets very low and records are in place. The level of disposal does not exceed 8%. The logbook has information on bycatch species, weight, and units. Accidental catches are not included on the IUCN Red list.
Habitat Impact
The fleet does not operate in Marine Protected Areas. The fishery occurs only in regulated areas 200 miles from the shore. There is no contact with the seabed because of trawls dimensions.
Social Accountability performance
The fleet complies with the human rights and regulations of the Republic of Korea, Philippines, Indonesia, and Myanmar.
Conclusion with reasons for approval
The fleet complies with Friend of the Sea requirements, without any major non-conformities.

Marine Harvest

Species scientific names: Pollachius virens
FAO area: 27
Fishing method: Danish seine
Last audit date: 27/01/2017
Next audit within: 11/05/2018
Status: Approved
Corrective Actions
Atlantic cod, saithe – Mixed gears – FAO 27
Species: Gadus morhua, Pollachius virens
Gear type: Danish seine, hand line, longline
Fishing Area: FAO Area 27
Fishery management
The North East Atlantic Fisheries Commission (NEAFC) is the competent regional organisation for fisheries management in the region (FAO Statistical Area 27). NEAFC takes advice from the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES), the intergovernmental organisation conducting research on marine resources in the North Atlantic.
In Iceland, the Icelandic Marine Research Institute (Hafrannsóknastofnun) also conducts regular research on the status of all major exploitable stocks. For instance, regular sampling is conducted from landings and the individuals length measured and weighed as well as determining their sex and gonad maturity.
 
Stock status:
Atlantic cod
The spawning stock biomass of cod in Icelandic waters is increasing and it is higher than has been observed over the last four decades. Fishing mortality has declined significantly in the last decade and it is presently at its historical low (ICES data published in 2016). Hence the stock of atlantic cod is currently not overexploited nor overfished.
 
Saithe
The spawning stock biomass of saithe in Icelandic waters in 2016 was above the MSY Btrigger. Fishing mortality has declined from 2009 and it is presently below FMSY (ICES data published in 2016). Hence the stock of saithe is currently not overexploited nor overfished.
 
Discards:
A total discard ban is set within the fishery and all catch is required to be landed. This is monitored in Iceland by the Directorate of Fisheries (Fiskistofa) at the port during unloading, by observers on the vessels, and by the coast guard at sea.
 
 
Resources:
Icelandic Marine Research Institute http://www.hafro.is/undir_eng.php?ID=9&REF=2
Icelandic Fisheries http://www.fisheries.is/
ICES http://www.ices.dk/Pages/default.aspx 
 

MCB Seafoods*

Species scientific names: Pollachius virens
FAO area: 27
Fishing methods: Gillnet – Trammel net
Last audit date: 10/06/2015
Next audit within: 04/08/2018
Status: Approved
Audit Report
Corrective Actions
Atlantic cod, saithe – Mixed gears – FAO 27

Species: Gadus morhua, Pollachius virens
Gear type: Danish seine, hand line, longline
Fishing Area: FAO Area 27

Fishery management
The North East Atlantic Fisheries Commission (NEAFC) is the competent regional organisation for fisheries management in the region (FAO Statistical Area 27). NEAFC takes advice from the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES), the intergovernmental organisation conducting research on marine resources in the North Atlantic.
In Iceland, the Icelandic Marine Research Institute (Hafrannsóknastofnun) also conducts regular research on the status of all major exploitable stocks. For instance, regular sampling is conducted from landings and the individuals length measured and weighed as well as determining their sex and gonad maturity.
 
Stock status:
Atlantic cod
The spawning stock biomass of cod in Icelandic waters is increasing and it is higher than has been observed over the last four decades. Fishing mortality has declined significantly in the last decade and it is presently at its historical low (ICES data published in 2016). Hence the stock of atlantic cod is currently not overexploited nor overfished.
 
Saithe
The spawning stock biomass of saithe in Icelandic waters in 2016 was above the MSY Btrigger. Fishing mortality has declined from 2009 and it is presently below FMSY (ICES data published in 2016). Hence the stock of saithe is currently not overexploited nor overfished.
 
Discards:
A total discard ban is set within the fishery and all catch is required to be landed. This is monitored in Iceland by the Directorate of Fisheries (Fiskistofa) at the port during unloading, by observers on the vessels, and by the coast guard at sea.
Resources:
Icelandic Marine Research Institute http://www.hafro.is/undir_eng.php?ID=9&REF=2
Icelandic Fisheries http://www.fisheries.is/
ICES http://www.ices.dk/Pages/default.aspx 
 

Marine Harvest

Species scientific name: Pleuronectes platessa
FAO area: 27
Fishing method: Danish seine
Last audit date: 27/01/2017
Next audit within: 11/05/2018
Status: Approved
Corrective Actions
Red rock lobster – Pot – FAO 57
 
Company: Ferguson Australia Pty Ltd
Species: Jasus edwardsii
Gear type: Pot
Fishing Area: FAO 57, South Australia
 
Fishery Management:
Primary Industries and Regions South Australia (PIRSA) is the government agency responsible for managing South Australia’s fish stocks. PIRSA manages South Australia’s fish stocks in partnership with key stakeholder groups and the community. A range of management tools are used to protect the State’s fisheries resources. These measures include output controls such as quota restrictions, daily catch limits, minimum and maximum size limits, as well as input controls such as closed areas, closed seasons, gear restrictions, vessel size and capacity restrictions, limited entry provisions, and limitations on the number of people that may assist with fishing operations. A Vessel Monitoring System (VMS) is also used to track the movements of vessels in some fisheries to assist in monitoring compliance with management arrangements.
Regulatory arrangements for the South Australian Rock Lobster Fishery are contained within the Fisheries Management (Rock Lobster Fisheries) Regulations 2006, Fisheries Management (Marine Scalefish Fisheries) Regulations 2006 and the Fisheries Management (General) Regulations 2007. Management of the fishery is described in management plans for the Northern Zone Rock Lobster Fishery (PIRSA 2014) and the Southern Zone Rock Lobster Fishery (PIRSA 2013).
A series of management arrangements have been introduced for the commercial fishery to control the catch of Rock Lobster in South Australia. A quota management system was introduced in the Southern Zone in 1993 and in the Northern Zone in 2003. Input controls including restrictions on the number of pots and seasonal closures are also in place. Minimum legal size limits and protection for spawning females also apply.
 
Stock Status:
PIRSA publishes the Status of SA Fisheries report, that brings together the best available information about the wild fish stocks.
The most recent status report for both the Northern and Southern Zone Rock Lobster Fisheries assessed the fisheries in the 2012-2013 fishing seasons. The primary measure for stock status in both zones of the South Australian Rock Lobster Fishery is the commercial CPUE of legal-sized Rock Lobster (kg/potlift). CPUE in lobster fisheries is accepted as being representative of lobster abundance and is measured using catch and effort data recorded and submitted in logbook returns.
In 2012-13, the Southern Zone Rock Lobster Fishery CPUE was 0.86 kg/potlift, which placed the catch rate of the fishery within the range considered to be sustainably fished at a TACC of 1,250 t. In 2012-13, the Northern Zone Rock Lobster Fishery CPUE was 0.99 kg/potlift, which placed the catch rate of the fishery within the range considered to be sustainably fished at a TACC of 345 t. On the basis of the evidence available, the Southern Zone Rock Lobster resource in both management units are classified as sustainable.
 
Habitat Impact:
An Environmental Risk Assessment of the South Australian Red Rock Lobster Fishery was conducted in 2011. The assessment ranked the risk to Red Rock Lobster as moderate; and the risk of capture of threatened, endangered and protected species in the Northern Zone (specifically Australian sea lions) as moderate. Pots are equipped with metal spikes to prevent sea lions pups to enter the trap. It did not identify any general ecosystem risks from the impacts of fishing (PIRSA 2011). The moderate and higher risks have strategies outlined in the management plan to address those risks.
 
References:
PIRSA http://www.pir.sa.gov.au/fishing
http://www.pir.sa.gov.au/fishing/publications/status_sa_fisheries_report
 

MCB Seafoods*

Species scientific names: Solea limanda, Solea solea, Platichthys flesus, Limanda limanda, Scophthalmus rhombus
FAO area: 27
Fishing method: Trammel net
Last audit date: 10/06/2015
Next audit within: 04/08/2018
Status: Approved
Audit Report
Corrective Actions
United Kingdom – Trammel net – Solea limanda, Solea solea, Platichthys flesus, Limanda limanda, Scophthalmus rhombus – FAO 27 (Atlantic, Northeast)
 
Fishery client: MCB SEAFOODS LTD.
Fishing area: FAO 27, Subarea 7.d, Eastern English Channel.
Fishing vessels: Under 10 meter artisanal fleet.
Vessels audited on site as fleet samples: NN70; SM300; SM700; NN114; LI575; LI579; H5.
Fishing method: Trammel net.
Certified species:
                             Scientific name / Common name
                             Microstomus kitt / Lemon
                             Solea solea / Dover sole
                             Platichthys flesus / Flounder
                             Limanda limanda / Dab
                             Scophthalmus rhombus / Brill

Management summary
The Inshore Fisheries Conservation Authority (IFCA) and the Department of Environment Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) inspect and manage the fisheries in the Eastern English Channel according to European law. The company fleet is operating with a quota approach according to the laws.
Stock status summary
The fishery assessment done by the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) has a database for Dover sole, which shows that the stock status of this species is not overexploited and overfished. Available data from the other species show that no more than 10% of the stock is caught.
Bycatch / discards
Vessels are under 10 mt and they are not obliged to the use of logbook. Nevertheless, most of them are filling a traceability paper. The fleet usually uses a mesh size of 11.2 cm, which is greater than the minimum required, to reduce accidental catch of undersized fish. Accidental catches are released alive at sea.
Habitat Impact
The fleet does not operate in Marine Protected Areas. According to the auditor, a quota system is in place for the fisheries and the trammel nets are not affecting the seabed.
Social Accountability performance
The fleet complies with the human rights and national regulations.
Conclusion with reasons for approval
The fleet complies with Friend of the Sea requirements. Even so, the necessity of the entire fleet fill the traceability paper, as well as the importance of reinforcing measures to minimize the loss of fishing nets have been reported and will be inspected at the next audit.

Strandport*

Species scientific names: Pleuronectes platessa, Microstomus kitt, Glyptocephalus cynoglossus
FAO area: 27
Fishing method: Bottom trawl, Danish seine
Last audit date: 18/08/2015
Next audit within: 17/08/2018
Status: Approved
Audit Report

European plaice – Danish seine – FAO 27


Species: Pleuronectes platessa
Gear type: Danish seine
Fishing Area: FAO Area 27

Fishery management: The North East Atlantic Fisheries Commission (NEAFC) is the competent regional organisation for fisheries management in the region (FAO Statistical Area 27). NEAFC takes advice from the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES), the intergovernmental organisation conducting research on marine resources in the North Atlantic.
In Iceland, the Icelandic Marine Research Institute (Hafrannsóknastofnun) also conducts regular research on the status of all major exploitable stocks. For instance, regular sampling is conducted from landings and the individuals length measured and weighed as well as determining their sex and gonad maturity.
In recent years, set TAC has been line with the advised levels. Catches do not overpass the set TAC. Different levels of area closures are in place.
 
Stock status:
Stock assessment is conducted yearly by MRI. Stock biomass is in an increasing trend while the exploitation rates have been decreasing. In fact, recruitment has been low but steady since 1994. Fishing mortality has declined since 1997 and is at an all-time low, while biomass has slowly increased since 2000 (MRI data published in 2016).
Habitat impact:
Protected, endangered and threatened species are not deemed to be impacted. The seabed is being mapped by MRI.
Discards:
A total discard ban is set within the fishery and all catch is required to be landed. This is monitored in Iceland by the Directorate of Fisheries (Fiskistofa) at the port during unloading, by observers on the vessels, and by the coast guard at sea.
 
Resources:
Icelandic Marine Research Institute http://www.hafro.is/undir_eng.php?ID=9&REF=2
Icelandic Fisheries http://www.fisheries.is/

MCB Seafoods*

Species scientific names: Sprattus sprattus, Clupea harrengus
FAO area: 27
Fishing method: Drift net
Last audit date: 10/06/2015
Next audit within: 04/08/2018
Status: Approved
Audit Report
Corrective Actions

S.sprattus

European sprat – Pelagic trawl – FAO 27
Species: Sprattus sprattus
Gear type: Pelagic trawl
Fishing Area: FAO Area 27 Atlantic North East – Subarea III; Subdivision 28.1 (Gulf of Riga)
Fishery management: The North East Atlantic Fisheries Commission (NEAFC) is the competent regional organisation for fisheries management in the region (FAO Statistical Area 27). NEAFC takes advice from the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES), the intergovernmental organisation conducting research on marine resources in the North Atlantic.
The fishery is managed by the Ministry of Agriculture Republic of Latvia and more specifically by the Fisheries department.
Stock status: According to the latest stock assessment published in 2016 by ICES, the stock of European sprat in the Baltic Sea is at full reproductive capacity and it is harvested sustainably.
Habitat impact: The fleet uses pelagic trawl set in the water column, without interacting with the seabed and the benthic communities.
Bycatch and discards are considered negligible (ICES 2016).
It is a legal requirement to land all fish caught. There is no minimum size so all the catch is marketed. Unmarketable fish (either too small or not popular) is sold for fishmeal.
Source:
Fisheries Department, Ministry of Agriculture, Republic of Latvia www.Zm.gov.lv
ICES Advice on fishing opportunities, catch and effort. Baltic Sea Ecoregion 2016. Sprat (Sprattus sprattus) in subdivisions 22–32 (Baltic Sea)

C.harrengus

Atlantic herring – Pelagic trawl – FAO 27
Species: Clupea harengus
Gear type: Pelagic trawl
Fishing Area: FAO Area 27 Atlantic North East – Subarea III; Subdivision 28.1 (Gulf of Riga)
Fishery management: The North East Atlantic Fisheries Commission (NEAFC) is the competent regional organisation for fisheries management in the region (FAO Statistical Area 27). NEAFC takes advice from the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES), the intergovernmental organisation conducting research on marine resources in the North Atlantic.
The fishery is managed by the Ministry of Agriculture Republic of Latvia and more specifically by the Fisheries department.
Stock status: According to the latest stock assessment of herring, published in 2016 by ICES, the stock of Atlantic herring in subdivision 28.1 is at full reproductive capacity and its biomass is above the maximum sustainable yield.
Habitat impact: The fleet uses pelagic trawl set in the water column, without interacting with the seabed and the benthic communities.
Bycatch and discards are considered negligible (ICES 2016).
It is a legal requirement to land all fish caught. There is no minimum size so all the catch is marketed. Unmarketable fish (either too small or not popular) is sold for fishmeal.
Source:
Fisheries Department, Ministry of Agriculture, Republic of Latvia www.Zm.gov.lv
ICES Advice on fishing opportunities, catch and effort. Baltic Sea Ecoregion 2016. Herring (Clupea harengus) in Subdivision 28.1 (Gulf of Riga)

Kurzeme Fishing Producers Organization

Species scientific names: Sprattus sprattus, Clupea harrengus
FAO area: 27
Fishing method: Pelagic trawl
Last audit date: 31/01/2017
Next audit within: 09/05/2018
Status: Approved
Audit Report

S.sprattus

European sprat – Pelagic trawl – FAO 27
Species: Sprattus sprattus
Gear type: Pelagic trawl
Fishing Area: FAO Area 27 Atlantic North East – Subarea III; Subdivision 28.1 (Gulf of Riga)
Fishery management: The North East Atlantic Fisheries Commission (NEAFC) is the competent regional organisation for fisheries management in the region (FAO Statistical Area 27). NEAFC takes advice from the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES), the intergovernmental organisation conducting research on marine resources in the North Atlantic.
The fishery is managed by the Ministry of Agriculture Republic of Latvia and more specifically by the Fisheries department.
Stock status: According to the latest stock assessment published in 2016 by ICES, the stock of European sprat in the Baltic Sea is at full reproductive capacity and it is harvested sustainably.
Habitat impact: The fleet uses pelagic trawl set in the water column, without interacting with the seabed and the benthic communities.
Bycatch and discards are considered negligible (ICES 2016).
It is a legal requirement to land all fish caught. There is no minimum size so all the catch is marketed. Unmarketable fish (either too small or not popular) is sold for fishmeal.
Source:
Fisheries Department, Ministry of Agriculture, Republic of Latvia www.Zm.gov.lv
ICES Advice on fishing opportunities, catch and effort. Baltic Sea Ecoregion 2016. Sprat (Sprattus sprattus) in subdivisions 22–32 (Baltic Sea)

C.harrengus

Atlantic herring – Pelagic trawl – FAO 27
Species: Clupea harengus
Gear type: Pelagic trawl
Fishing Area: FAO Area 27 Atlantic North East – Subarea III; Subdivision 28.1 (Gulf of Riga)
Fishery management: The North East Atlantic Fisheries Commission (NEAFC) is the competent regional organisation for fisheries management in the region (FAO Statistical Area 27). NEAFC takes advice from the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES), the intergovernmental organisation conducting research on marine resources in the North Atlantic.
The fishery is managed by the Ministry of Agriculture Republic of Latvia and more specifically by the Fisheries department.
Stock status: According to the latest stock assessment of herring, published in 2016 by ICES, the stock of Atlantic herring in subdivision 28.1 is at full reproductive capacity and its biomass is above the maximum sustainable yield.
Habitat impact: The fleet uses pelagic trawl set in the water column, without interacting with the seabed and the benthic communities.
Bycatch and discards are considered negligible (ICES 2016).
It is a legal requirement to land all fish caught. There is no minimum size so all the catch is marketed. Unmarketable fish (either too small or not popular) is sold for fishmeal.
Source:
Fisheries Department, Ministry of Agriculture, Republic of Latvia www.Zm.gov.lv
ICES Advice on fishing opportunities, catch and effort. Baltic Sea Ecoregion 2016. Herring (Clupea harengus) in Subdivision 28.1 (Gulf of Riga)

Omega Protein Inc.

Species scientific name: Brevoortia tyrannus
FAO area: 21
Fishing method: Purse seine
Last audit date: 19/02/2017
Next audit within: 19/02/2018
Status: Approved
Audit Report
USA – Atlantic menhaden – Purse seine – FAO 21
Species: Brevoortia tyrannus (Atlantic menhaden)
Gear type: Purse seine
Fishing Area: FAO Area 21, Northwest Atlantic

Fishery management: The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC) is the competent fishery management organisation.
ASMFC conducts two types of stock assessments: a benchmark stock assessment and a stock assessment update. The former is a full analysis and review of the stock condition, focusing on the consideration of new data sources and newer assessment models. This assessment is conducted every three to five years and undergoes a formal peer review by a panel of independent fisheries scientists who evaluate whether the data and methods used to produce the assessment are scientifically sound and appropriate for management use. The latter incorporates data from the most recent years into the peer-reviewed assessment model to determine current stock status (abundance and overfishing level).
Stock status: Based on the revised reference points recommended by the 2015 benchmark stock assessment, the stock of Atlantic menhaden is neither overfished nor experiencing overfishing. The revised reference points are based on historical performance of the population during the time frame 1960-2012, a period during which the Technical Committee considers the population to have been sustainably fished.
Fishing mortality rates have remained below the revised overfishing threshold (1.26) since the 1960s, and have hovered around the revised overfishing target (0.38) through the 1990s. In 2003, fishing mortality was estimated to be 0.22. Fishing mortality has been decreasing throughout the history of the fishery, and is now 42% below the target.
 
Habitat impact: The fleet uses purse seine, which is set in the water column, with only occasional interaction with the seabed and hence low impact on the benthic communities.
Bycatch and discards: The fishery maintains records of bycatch and discards. The fishing gear used is highly selective and an excluder device is used to exclude large animals from the tube used to pump fish on board the vessel.
Source:
Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC) http://www.asmfc.org/
 

Omega Protein Inc.

Species scientific name: Brevoortia petronus
FAO area: 31
Fishing method: Purse seine
Last audit date: 19/02/2017
Next audit within: 19/02/2018
Status: Approved
Audit Report
USA – Gulf menhaden – Purse seine – FAO 31
Species: Brevoortia petronus (Gulf menhaden)
Gear type: Purse seine
Fishing Area: FAO Area 31 (Gulf of Mexico)
Fishery management: The Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission (GSMFC) is the competent fishery management organisation, responsible of setting policies and conducting the stock assessment.
A stock assessment update was published in 2016, including data from 2012 to 2015 to previous assessment.
Stock status: According to 2016 GSMFC report, the fishing mortality rate decreased during the 1990s and has remained low since then. Spawning stock biomass has increased steadily since the 1990s and has remained high since then. The Gulf of Mexico Gulf menhaden stock is not experiencing overfishing and is not overfished.
Habitat impact: The fleet uses purse seine, which is set in the water column, with only occasional interaction with the seabed and hence low impact on the benthic communities.
Bycatch and discards: The fishery maintains records of bycatch and discards. The fishing gear used is highly selective and an excluder device is used to exclude large animals from the tube used to pump fish on board the vessel.
Source
Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission (GSMFC) http://www.gsmfc.org/
http://www.gsmfc.org/publications/GSMFC%20Number%20254.pdf

Mollusc

PT. Windublambangan Sejati

Species scientific name: Octopus cyanea
FAO area: 57
Fishing method: Hook
Last audit date: 08/08/2017
Next audit within: 10/10/2018
Status: Approved
Audit Report
Indonesia – Hook – Octopus cyanea – FAO 57 (Indian Ocean, Eastern)

Fishery client: PT Windublambangan Sejati.
Fishing area: FAO 57, Northern (Subarea 57.2).
Fishing vessels: The Company has a fleet of 57 vessels.
Vessels audited on site as fleet samples: 552.2/663/V/406.026/2017; 552.2/655/V/406.026/2017; 552.2/677/V/406.026/2017; 552.2/398/IV/406.026/2017; 552.2/665/V/406.026/2017; 552.2/667/V/406.026/2017; 552.2/1655/XII/406.026/2016; 552.2/1657/XII/406.026/2016.
Fishing method: Hook.
Certified species: Scientific name: Octopus cyanea;
                                  Common name: Octopus.

Management summary
The Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries (MMAF) is responsible for the management of the fisheries sector in Indonesia. The mission of the MMAF is to apply principles of responsible, competitive and sustainable management of marine and fisheries resources. Small-scale or artisanal fishing refers to fishing boats with less than 12 meter in length, using passive gears, involving day trips with a minimal crew (one or two fishermen). The audited company has this format and all boats are registered with Marine & Fisheries Department, Trenggalek District, East Java. Octopus season is from Sept to Jan (Feb to Aug is low season).


Stock status summary
There is no statistical studies on octopus on the MMAF official website. However, according to FAO Statistical Area 57, the exploitation status of Octopodidae is moderate.


Bycatch / discards
Octopus are caught with hooks. Thus, bycatch is very limited and corresponds to 2.3% of total catches. The company has landing data since 2016 and, according to this information, bycatch are Trichiurus lepturus, Epinephulus spp., and Thunnus albacaras. None of these are included in the IUCN Red List.


Habitat Impact
There is no Marine Protected Areas identified in Trenggalek area. Fishing vessels are under 5 GT and operate from 0.5 to 18 Km from the shore, returning on the same day. The fleet use hook for fishing octopus, thus the seabed and benthic communities are not affected.


Social Accountability performance
The fleet complies with the human rights and Australian regulations.


Conclusion with reasons for approval
The fleet complies with Friend of the Sea requirements, without any non-conformity.
* Companies that have applied for certification before the current accredited system.